Tag Archives | sugar free

Sea Salt Popcorn with Kale Crumbles

Kale Popcorn Recipe Meme

I’ll be the first to admit it….there is SOMETHING about movie theater popcorn that is utterly delicious. And, no visit to the movie theater feels complete without it.

I also know that just two or three handfuls isn’t enough of this addicting, salty, crunchy snack. Before you know it your down to the crumbs….and those can’t be left behind either! I hope I’m not alone with this…

Unfortunately, the traditional movie theater popcorn doesn’t do much for our health. According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest a medium popcorn and soda combo at a Regal movie theater is calorically comparable to three McDonalds Quarter Pounders with 12 extra pats of butter!!!! 

Give me a minute while I pick my jaw up off the ground…..

If you have worked with me, heard me speak or attended one of my workshops you know that I’m not one to dwell on calories. Using calories is a misguided way of choosing healthy foods, in my opinion. To put is simply – 300 calories of broccoli and 300 calories of jelly beans just are not the same nutritionally speaking.

However, the comparison of popcorn to fast food and a load of butter take it to a whole new level. This is NOT ok – especially since sitting and watching a two-house movie isn’t exactly a super energy burning activity.

Aside from the ridiculous number of calories in that box of popcorn we should also talk about the QUALITY of the ingredients. Popcorn ingredients and process varies from theater to theater. But, suffice to say that cheap, low quality ingredients are the norm everywhere. They want to make max profit on that $8 box they’re selling!

Corn is one of the main GM (genetically modified) foods in the US, so you can be sure that this is the kind movie theaters are popping up into those white clouds of crunchy goodness. GM foods have become a concern for many in regards to our health and environmental impacts.

But the yumminess of our popcorn doesn’t stop there. The oil and salt is what makes eating it so satisfying! Many years ago movie theaters used coconut oil to make their popcorn but it has since been demonized as being an unhealthy saturated fat (in case you haven’t heard, coconut oil is NOT bad for you!). In response theaters started popping corn using low quality, canola oil – a VERY unhealthy trans fat. The salt is your traditional, iodized salt which has been depleted of critical minerals. Adding that buttery topping? You’re squirting artificial flavorings, colors and who knows what other weird stuff on there.

I’m not here to ruin your next movie theater experience. I want to give you an amazing alternative that will satisfy the biggest salt craving and add some wonderful nutrients to this normally guilt inducing snack.

Bring your big purse and sneak a few bags into your next movie date…..not that I’m speaking from experience here….

I do recommend getting a air popcorn popper. They usually run no more than $20 and will provide you will endless bowls of delicious, fresh, chemical free snacking. And, a cheap movie snack!

Kale Popcorn Recipe Meme

Sea Salt Popcorn with Kale Crumbles
Serves 3-4

Ingredients

For the kale crumbles
1 large bunch of kale (you can also use bagged kale if you prefer)
1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted
sea salt

For the popcorn
1/4 cup organic popping corn (the organic label ensures that you are also buying a non-GMO product).
6 tablespoons extra virgin coconut oil, melted
2 teaspoons sea salt
Nutritional yeast, to take (optional)

Instructions – kale crumbles

1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees.

2. Remove ribs from kale and cut into large pieces (1 1/2 to 2 inches). Place kale pieces on a baking sheet and drizzle with the melt coconut oil. Toss until well coated. You want the kale to be slightly coated with oil, not dripping. Sprinkle with a few pinches of sea salt.

3. Place baking sheet in oven and bake for about 20 minutes, turning the leaves halfway through. Keep an eye on them as they can burn quickly. Remove from oven when most of the kale is crisped – often not all will crisp up in the oven, but will finish while the kale cools on the pan. Place the pan on a heat safe surface until the kale cools completely.

4. Once the kale is cool, crumble it in your hands into a small bowl. Set aside.

Instructions – popcorn

1. While the kale is in the oven you can make your popcorn using an air popper.

2. If you don’t have an air popper you can do it on the stovetop. Using the biggest pot you have heat about 1 tablespoon of coconut oil over medium heat. When hot add your corn, cover with a lid and reduce heat to medium-low (the temperature may vary depending on your stove). Shake the pot every 30-45 second to keep the kernels moving around so they don’t burn. Covering the pot lid with a dishtowel can help keep the heat from your hands. Keep shaking until you hear popping, turn off the heat and let the pot sit on the stove until the popping stops. You might want to give it a shake or two while the corn pops to keep the kernels moving.

3. Once your popcorn is done, pour it into a bowl, drizzle with the melted coconut oil and sprinkle with salt, nutritional yeast (if using) and kale crumbles. Don’t go too crazy with the salt! Don’t forget the kale has some salt on it and the nutritional yeast also has a salty flavor. Taste and add more salt if needed.

Comments { 1 } · Posted on April 13, 2016 in Healthy Recipes

Cleanse Q&A

The 14-Day Whole Foods Cleanse starts in less than 2 weeks! Friday, January 16th to be exact.

I’ve gotten some questions about the cleanse and decided to do a quick video explaining the top three questions I’ve been getting:

1. What will we be eating?
2. Will I have to cook?
3. How does an online program work?

Check out the video below and get all the answers.

This program is not about short-lived solutions, but rather about creating real, sustainable change in the way you shop, cook, eat and live.

There is one question I didn’t answer in the video….

How do I know if the cleanse is right for me?

Great question! The cleanse is not for everyone. However, it IS for you if…..

– You’re sick and tired and feeling sick and tired
– You finally want to know exactly what to eat to experience optimal health, great energy, mental clarity and a healthy weight
– You want simple recipes that don’t require 25 ingredients you can only buy at a crazy expensive specialty store
– You’re physically, mentally and emotionally ready to take charge of your health and learn a new way of nourishing your body
You want to learn, have fun and enjoy great food!

You can learn more about the cleanse HERE. I hope to see you there!

Comments { 0 } · Posted on January 5, 2015 in Events

Gingered Cabbage and Carrot Slaw

I typically serve a big salad with every dinner. We skip salad plates and usually just eat it right out of a big ceramic salad bowl we received as a wedding gift. It’s become such a habit that I always forget to give dinner guests salad plates and I have to stop myself from diving fork-first into the bowl. You know your friends are considered family when they are invited to eat directly out of your salad bowl.

Yes, we keep it classy on the homestead!

Since delicate greens aren’t quite in season yet I’ve been relying on heartier veggies to create fresh and crunchy salad concoctions. Using things like cabbage, carrots, fennel and Brussels sprouts as bases for salads means salad leftover end up being lunch the next day instead of compost. I made this Gingered Cabbage and Carrot Slaw on a Friday and we ate from it the rest of the weekend! Plus, using your food processor saves a ton of time and your knuckles will be happy that they are not coming into contact with the box grater. THAT is never a good thing!

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Gingered Cabbage and Carrot Slaw

Ingredients

For the salad
handful of parsley
2 medium carrots, peeled
1/4 of a head of green cabbage, cut in half
1/2 an apple, chopped

For the dressing
Juice of 1 lemon (lime juice would work too)
1/2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar (optional, depends on how sour you like it)
1 drop DoTERRA ginger essential oil (you can also finely grate fresh ginger, use about 1/2 tablespoon and add more if needed)
salt and pepper to taste
drizzle of organic extra virgin olive oil (about 2 teaspoons)

Instructions

    1. Add the parsley to the food processor and pulse until roughly chopped. You don’t have to remove the parsley from the food processor. You’re basically going to build your salad in the food processor. Add grating insert and the grate carrots. Then, remove the grating insert and replace with the slicing insert. Slice the cabbage into the carrots and parsley.
    2. Put the prepared vegetables into your serving bowl and add the apples. Toss until well combined and set aside.
    3. In a small bowl mix the lemon juice, apple cider vinegar (if using), ginger and a generous pinch of salt. Whisk until well combined and pour over the slaw. Mix the slaw until well coated. Let sit for at least 10 minutes before serving. The salt and acid will help soften the cabbage a bit and draw out some of the water. Shortly before serving drizzle the olive oil on top and add some freshly grated pepper. Toss and serve. Enjoy!

Are you on Facebook? Then make sure you are a Home Cooked Healing fan! All fans will be entered in the Sassy Saltbox Giveaway. Drawing will take place April, 1 2014!

Comments { 0 } · Posted on March 18, 2014 in General, Healthy Recipes

Totally tasty turnip slaw

It is sad that many fall and winter vegetables get a bad rap. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, beets, celery root and parsnips often get passed over for  prettier, flashier produce. The next time you’re at the farmers market or grocery don’t breeze past these seasonal standbys!

Here’s why. Winter is also described as the dreaded “cold and flu season.” But, we forget that nature knows exactly how to take care of us to help prevent sniffles, sneezes and sore throats. Many of the veggies available this time of year are packed with the vitamins and minerals you need to support your immune system and fight off winter illness.

Think oranges are your best and only source of flu fighting vitamin C? Not so! Many of our winter green vegetables like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale and spinach have more vitamin C than an orange in addition to lots of other amazing nutrients to balance blood sugar, boost energy and support healthy blood pressure. Other winter veggies like beets and parsnips are packed with vitamin A and other minerals that your immune system needs in order to put up it’s strongest defenses.

For a recent cooking class I was challenged to use turnips. My client had a field of turnips and wanted some more inspiration to use her growing stockpile. I have to admit that I’d passed over these guys more often than not at the market but was excited to create a simple and delicious way to use them.

Turnips are a very typical winter root vegetable. This time of year they are usually white with some red-purple color at the top where the greens grow. You can use them as a replacement for potatoes in a hearty stew or cook and blend them into a creamy soup with cauliflower. I think they are especially delicious raw!

If you know me at all you know how much I love salad. But, this time of year eating a green leafy salad is just not appealing to me. When I came across making a turnip slaw I was excited about being able to put a salad-dish back on the dinner table that matched the season a bit more than green leaves.

Turns out this salad keeps VERY well. You can store any leftovers in a jar and take them to work with lunch the next day. You might have to add a pinch of salt or splash of vinegar because the flavor can subside a bit when it sits.

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I used my spiralizer for to cut my turnips. This is one of my favorite kitchen gadgets EVER! What it does it quickly turn any firm vegetable or fruit into a fun spiral shape. You can spiralize zucchini into “pasta,” potatoes for roasting or carrots, beets, turnips, apples and more for salads and other food decor. Every time I’ve used the spiralizer at a cooking demo or class people go nuts over it and vow to buy one right away. If you use a large fruit or vegetable you will end up with a never-ending spiral. What I like to do is then cut the spirals a few time with a knife to make eating a little easier and less messy 🙂 If you don’t have a spiralizer you can shred your turnip on the larger holes of a box grater.

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Raw Turnip Slaw with Carrot and Parsley

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

2 medium raw turnips
1 small/medium carrot
2 tablespoons red onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon honey or real maple syrup
Handful of parsley, chopped
Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Place the chopped onion in a small bowl and cover with warm water. Set aside. This will draw some of the spice from the onions so they become more mild.
  2. Whisk together the vinegar, olive oil and honey until smooth in your salad serving bowl. Set aside.
  3. Peel the turnip and carrot and grate or spiralize them into the serving bowl with the dressing. Toss until well combined and season with salt and pepper to taste. Enjoy!
Comments { 0 } · Posted on November 26, 2013 in Healthy Recipes

Tasty trail mix with toasted coconut

Food….I never leave home without it!

No matter where I go I always have some sort of snack stashed in my purse. If I’m on the run all day I pack a whole grocery bag of goodies. Yes, it might seem a little much but it certainly saves me from scrounging for something while I’m out and about and my blood sugar start going dangerously low.

I used to not be this prepared. In the past I wouldn’t eat until my blood sugar was dangerously low – I would feel tired, my heart would start beating faster and I would get the worst case of hangry (hungry AND angry). My friends and family knew that when my eyes started to glaze over and my sense of humor disappeared it was time to feed Tanya. NOW!

hangry

When you’re constantly fighting that blood sugar roller coaster you will always default to the worst choice possible – chocolate bars, blueberry muffins, coffee cake and ice cream will be your defaults. These were my regular snacks and meals for a long time. Nearly 10 years ago when Mr. Wes and I first met he wooed me with candy gummies, lollipops, candy bars and scooter crunch ice cream. I kid you not! He put boxes of candy in the interoffice mail to me when we worked together and met me in my college parking lot after class with a cooler full of ice cream. We laugh now that my standards are much higher now so he has to work a little harder!

My favorite snack to keep on hand is trail mix. Sure, there are plenty of ready made trail mixes to buy and some stores even have “trail mix bars” where you can mix your own. However, those nuts are usually salted and roasted in low quality oils. Some even have sugar, preservatives and other funky ingredients in them. I say, save your money and mix your own!

The secret ingredient to my trail mix is toasted coconut. Coconut contains lauric acid, a medium chain fatty acid which increases HDL (good) cholesterol and is utilized as a source of energy instead of being stored as fat. Plus, it’s delicious!

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So, before you get hangry, get these ingredients and make your own totally tasty trail mix! These are the ingredients I like to use but you can certainly experiment and make your own. In the comments below tell me what you like to add to your trail mix.

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Tasty Trail Mix with Toasted Coconut

Ingredients 

Handful of each of the following:
large coconut flakes (make sure they are unsweetened)
cashews and almonds
pumpkin seeds
raw cacao nibs or chocolate chips (I like The Good Life brand)
Raisins and chopped dried apricots

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Place coconut on a baking sheet and toast for 5-6 minutes. It will brown VERY quickly so keep a close eye on it. You want it to brown very slightly.
  2. Mix the nuts, seeds, cocoa nibs or chocolate chips, raisins and dried apricots in a large bowl. Add the toasted coconut and mix until well combined.
  3. Store your trail mix in jars or divide up into baggies for easy grab and go. Enjoy!
Comments { 0 } · Posted on November 7, 2013 in General, Healthy Recipes

White Bean and Olive Spread and Herbed Quark Spread

Finding a healthy snack or lunch option at work can be like walking through a minefield. First you have to make it past the office candy bowl full of Halloween chocolates, sneak around the cookies in the vending machine and avoid eye contact with the cupcakes in the office kitchen. When that midday slump creeps up on us it’s hard to not reach for the nearest sugary treat to give us a jumpstart.

Once you start fueling yourself with “the white stuff” you will be on the sugar rollercoaster all day long. Not fun! One minute you feel great and totally energized, the next your energy level has left the building and you’re sneaking back to the office kitchen for “just one more cupcake.” And, once you’re on the ride it’s nearly impossible to get off.

Bringing your own snacks and lunches to work is key in not falling down the sugar rabbit hole. However, not just any snack will do! Focusing on snacks and lunches with protein and healthy fats will help keep your blood sugar stable, your energy up and your mind focused. Plus, your sugar cravings will decrease and you won’t give that vending machine a second glance.

With everything else you have to do when you get home from work there isn’t a lot of time for packing a lunch. That is why I really love making spreads that I can use on a sandwich or as a dip for crackers and veggies. Just pack them in small glass container or jars and they are ready for you to spread away! Spreads and dips are also a wonderful protein-rich after school snack for your kids instead of sugar-laden cereals, cookies, crackers and pre-packaged trail mixes.

This week I’ve included 2 recipes for my favorite spreads. They can be used on their own for a filling veggie sandwich or in addition to a meat sandwich instead of mayo. If you want to make it super quick, then use them as a dip for your favorite cracker or veggies.

White Bean and Olive Spread with Sundried Tomatoes

Serves 3-5

1 15-ounce cans white beans, rinsed and drained
1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons kalamata olives, chopped
2 tablespoons sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
Juice of ½ a lemon
Sea salt and pepper to taste

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the beans, olive oil, olives, tomatoes and lemon juice. Add salt and pepper to taste. Roughly mash the mixture with the back of a fork.
  2. Store in an airtight container for 2-3 days.
  3. You can use this to make a sandwich with sprouts, thinly sliced red onion and avocado. It is also a wonderful dip for crackers or veggies.

Herbed Quark Spread

Quark is a type of cheese with a creamy texture similar to Greek yogurt and a refreshing tangy taste. It is very popular in Europe and used as a dip, spread, in cakes and even on the skin to alleviate pain and clear blemishes. Quark is a rich source of protein, high in calcium for strong bones and teeth, vitamin A for healthy eyesight and B vitamins to support the nervous system. Try it as a savory spread or as a sweet breakfast option with your favorite berries, nuts or granola!

1 container of quark
Selection of fresh herbs like parsley, thyme, oregano and tarragon
Lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the quark, herbs and splash of lemon juice. Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined.
  2. Store in an airtight container for 3-4 days.
  3. This spread is perfect on a hearty multigrain bread with thinly sliced radishes. It is also a great topping for baked potatoes, sweet potatoes, broccoli and cauliflower.
Comments { 0 } · Posted on October 25, 2013 in Healthy Recipes

A fall favorite – basic beef stew

Beef stew screams fall. Just the THOUGHT of beef stew has me thinking cozy fires, comfy blankets and fuzzy slippers. I used to think making beef stew was something only my mom could make. Why? Because it seemed very complicated and labor intensive. Plus, I was afraid it would never taste as good as hers. That can be a big stumbling block! Even though my mom doesn’t live far away I recently realized that if I want beef stew, it’s up to me to make it.

After a brief call to mom I dove in and made a very simple but amazingly delicious beef stew. That was about 6 weeks ago and Mr. Wes has requested beef stew two more times. I would offer him pizza and he would ask “do you have any more of that beef stew?” Yeah, it’s that good!

As the title suggests, this is a very basic recipe. Don’t be afraid to add different veggies, herbs and seasonings. You could throw in turnips or even cubed butternut squash for a nice sweet/savory dish. I like to double the recipe and then freeze it in small jars for great single serving lunches and dinners.

Enjoy!

 

Basic Beef Stew

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

Olive oil
1 ¼-1 ½ lbs organic beef roast, cubed (you can also by already cubed beef if you like)
1 pound of leeks, washed and roughly chopped. Whites and some of the pale green parts (if you don’t have leeks use one large white onion)
2 garlic cloves, minced
2-3 medium carrots, cut into bite sized pieces
4-5 medium potatoes (yellow or redskin will work), cut into bite sized pieces
4-5 cups of water or homemade stock
1 bay leaf
sea salt and pepper to taste
dried herbs of your choice. I like savory and thyme.

Instructions

  1. In a large pot or Dutch oven heat a generous glug of olive oil over medium heat. Add the beef cubes and a pinch of salt. Brown the meat about 8-10 minutes until it becomes nice a caramelized and juices start releasing. Give it a stir every few minutes so it cooks pretty evenly.
  2. Place the partially cooked meat in a bowl along with the juices. Set aside. Put your pot back on the stove over medium heat and add about 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add your chopped leeks and a pinch of salt. Cook the leeks, stirring occasionally, until they begin to soften a bit, about 4-5 minutes.
  3. Add the garlic, carrots and potatoes to the pot and continue cooking the vegetables another 5-6 minutes, giving them the occasional stir so they cook evenly. If they start getting stuck to the bottom of the pot add a splash of water. This will help prevent sticking and release delicious browned bits from the bottom of the pot.
  4. Once your veggies have cooked a bit and become slightly softened add your meat and juice back to the pot along with the water bay leaf, a generous pinch of salt and herbs of choice. You want your ingredients to be covered by about an inch of water. Cover the pot, raise the heat to medium high and bring the stew to a boil, then lower to a simmer. Cook the stew for about 30 minutes, checking occasionally and giving it a stir. Your veggies should be soft but not mushy and your meat cooked through.
  5. Before serving, taste the broth and add salt and pepper and needed. Enjoy!
Comments { 0 } · Posted on October 22, 2013 in General, Healthy Recipes

Kick Out Cancer with Cabbage

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and this weeks fall soup recipe is packed with a food that can help us kick cancer in the kitchen. By cooking and eating whole, unprocessed foods you are taking a huge step towards preventing and recovering from cancer and many other diseases. True health really begins in your kitchen!

The American Cancer Society’s key recommendation to reduce the risk of cancer is to eat cruciferous vegetables on a regular basis. Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage. This group of vegetables contains more phytochemicals (mostly in the form of glucocsinolates) with demonstrable anticancer properties than any other vegetable family. Popular studies have shown that the higher the intake of these vegetables the lower the rates of cancer, particularly colon, prostate, lung and breast cancer.

Cabbage is “king” of the cruciferous vegetable family because of its extra-special health powers. The glucocsinolates in cabbage work primarily by increasing antioxidant mechanisms and improving the body’s ability to detoxify and eliminate harmful chemicals and hormones. That means keeping cancer out and inviting health in!

If that wasn’t enough, cabbage also has more vitamin C than oranges. A weakened immune system doesn’t just open you up for the common cold but also creates a more hospitable environment for cancer.

Fall is a great time to fill up on cabbage and all its amazing nutritional benefits. The market has beautiful tender cabbage that is sweet, crisp and perfect for a warming soup. Stop by the demonstration tent between 3-5 pm this afternoon to see how this delicious soup is made and get the first taste. You’ll never look at cabbage the same way again!

Curried Cabbage and Potato Soup

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

½ head green cabbage (about 16-20 ounces)
1 tablespoon coconut oil or extra virgin olive oil
4-5 medium potatoes, unpeeled, cut into smaller than bite sized cubes
2 tablespoons Thai green curry paste (you can also use Indian powdered curry)
3 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
5 cups of water or vegetable broth
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
sea salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Remove any ragged leaves from the cabbage. Halve the cabbage (so you have two quarters) and remove the core. Slice the cabbage into thin strips about as thick as a pencil. You can do this with a knife or on a mandolin. Cut the long strips in half once.
  2. Warm the coconut oil over medium heat in a large heavy bottomed pot or Dutch oven. Add the potatoes and a pinch of salt. Cook the potatoes, stirring occasionally for about 5-7 minutes until they start to become tender and brown a bit. They may stick a bit but don’t worry. The water will help get those stuck bits off the bottom. Stir in the curry paste (or powder), garlic and onion. Cook for another minute or so.
  3. Add the water and chickpeas. Raise the heat and bring the soup to a simmer. Add the cabbage and cook for another 3-4 minutes until it begins to soften. Don’t worry if it looks like there’s a lot of cabbage. It will collapse quite a bit.
  4. Taste your broth and add salt and pepper as needed. If you want a stronger flavor you can add more curry paste or a few shots of tamari. Enjoy!

Serving Suggestion: This soup is delicious on it’s own but I really love it with a splash of coconut milk which gives it a very distinct Thai flavor. Or, you can add less water and put in a whole can of coconut milk – also delicious! You can also add a cup of cooked brown rice or millet to make it even heartier and filling.

Comments { 0 } · Posted on October 15, 2013 in Healthy Recipes

Beet Slaw with Horseradish

Beets – you either love them or hate them. If you already love them, welcome to the club! If you hate them chances are you’ve had the misfortune of encountering the canned kind on a restaurant salad. I agree. That version is less than stellar. I’m here to convert the haters into total beet-lovers so they can join the club and reap all the incredible benefits. Because, not only is this club delicious, it will do amazing things for your health! Here are just a few reasons to put beautiful beets back in your diet.

1.     Love Your Liver: Your liver works 24/7 to keep to you clean and clear of toxins that enter your body. So, it’s important to give it a little love! Beets have long been used for medicinal purposes because of their ability to stimulate and liver’s detoxification processes.
2.     Beets for your Heartbeat: Beets are generally very supportive of the blood and circulation. Specifically, they contain important phytonutrients such as betanin and isobetanin and key nutrient choline that can inhibit inflammatory markers linked to heart disease.
3.     Grab the Greens: The most nutritious beets are those with the greens still attached. Cut them off as soon as you get home or they will begin to wilt. The greens are highly nutritious and shouldn’t be discarded. They are rich in folic acid, especially important for healthy development of the fetus during pregnancy. They are also an excellent source of vitamin K for strong bones and vitamin A for good eyesight and healthy skin. You can sauté with garlic them, add them to soups or use the tender greens in a salad.

I recently made this recipe at my local farmers market and it was a big hit! The lovers AND haters were big fans of this salad and everyone was amazed at how quick and simple the recipe is. The memorable response was a couple who stopped by once the crowd had subsided a bit. The woman asked for a sample and in the same breath told me how she really didn’t care for beets. She took a hesitant spoonful, paused, nodded and took another bite. Her response….”this is actually pretty good!” Her husband was stunned and said,

“I’ve been married to this woman for 30 years and I’ve NEVER seen her eat a beet before!”

What can I say folks…I’m here for all your foodie firsts! 🙂

Raw Beet Slaw with Horseradish

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 to 1 ½ pounds beets, scrubbed
1 large or 2 small spring onion
1 tablespoon fresh horseradish, or more if you like it spicier (Jarred works as well. Read the label to ensure you recognize the ingredients and it’s free of flavorings and oils.)
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 sprig tarragon, minced (optional)
¼ cup parsley, chopped
salt and pepper to taste

Instructions
1. Grate the beets on the large grating insert of your food processor. (You can also use a box grater. If you grate them by hand rubber gloves can be very handy!) Scrape grated beets into a large bowl.
2. Peel the horseradish and grate it finely in the food processor or on a box grater. Add it to the beets and mix until well combined.
3. Add the olive oil, vinegar and herbs to the beets and horseradish. Combine well. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Enjoy!

Serving Suggestions: This slaw can be eaten with crackers, on a sandwich, with grilled meat or alongside a hearty green salad. When in season grated carrots are a nice addition to this dish and replacing the horseradish with ginger gives it a refreshing bite. You can store this salad, covered in the fridge for up to 3 days.

Photo from HERE

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone by Mark Bittman
Comments { 0 } · Posted on June 21, 2013 in Healthy Recipes

Sautéed Bok Choy with Garlic and Ginger

Bok choy has got it all! It has a deliciously sweet and mild taste. Its leaves are tender while its stalks provide a satisfying crunch. Plus, it cooks up quickly! It is most often used in Asian soups and stir-fries but can also be added to salads or served on it’s own as a fantastic side dish. Being part of the cabbage family it is of course also packed with amazing nutrients that are beneficial for your health

Here are 3 reasons to bring this tasty green home today!

Lower Blood Pressure Naturally: Bok choy is packed with potassium and calcium, both of which help to lower blood pressure.
Your Antioxidant Ally: This veggie is loaded in antioxidant vitamins A and C. One cup of cooked bok choy provides more than 100% of the RDA of vitamin A and almost two-thirds the RDA vitamin C.
Dynamic Digestion: Bok choy is a good source of fiber, which is essential for a healthy digestive system. Fiber also helps manage weight, balance blood sugar and helps eliminate toxins.

The farmers market is abundant with bok choy this time of year. Stop by the market this afternoon between 3 and 7 to pick up a few bunches. Then, stop by the demo tent to see me make this recipe so you’ll be ready to hit the kitchen when you get home!

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Sautéed Bok Choy with Garlic and Ginger

Serves 4

Ingredients
½ tablespoon coconut oil
2 bunches bok choy
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 clove garlic
2 teaspoon tamari
drizzle of toasted sesame oil
salt to taste
pinch of crushed red pepper (optional)

Instructions

  1. Prepare the bok choy by cutting the stalk parts from the leaves. Slice the stalks at an angle into 1-inch pieces. Layer the leaves on top of each other, roll up tightly and slice into 1-inch strips. Place stalks and leaves in separate bowls.
  2. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Sauté the stalks with a pinch of salt about 3-4 minutes, until they start to become translucent and tender. Add garlic and ginger and give a good stir to combine.
  3. Add the leaves to the pan and toss well so everything is combined. Sauté the leaves about 1 minute until they begin to wilt lightly. Add tamari and toasted sesame oil. Heat through about 1 more minute. Taste and add more tamari, sesame oil or salt as necessary. Enjoy!

Serving suggestions: You can serve this as a side dish alongside chicken or fish. It’s also delicious mixed with brown rice and topped with a fried egg for a quick and simple dinner.

Comments { 0 } · Posted on May 22, 2013 in Healthy Recipes