Tag Archives | cabbage

Warm Cabbage and Fennel “Salad”

Mister Wes and I always eat dinner at the island in our kitchen. Yes, we have a small dining room table just steps away but for whatever reason the island has become our spot. It’s our table/island for two.

When dinner is ready I take the pots, pans, dishes…whatever dinner is made in, do a 180 degree turn from the stove and plop them directly on the island. I grab some serving utensils, plates and silverware and dinner is served. Voila! And, clean up is a breeze. My leftover containers are in the kitchen island and the dishwasher is pretty much within arms reach of where Mister Wes sits. I clean up leftovers and he puts away the dishes. We make one hell of a team!

If you’ve been following me for a while or have attended a class you know that I LOVE salad. I’m not saying that to be the annoying health nut, nutrition coach over here. Seriously, salad is so damn good….if you can make a good salad that is. I’ve got to tell you, I can make a pretty kick ass salad. I had a cooking class student a while back tell me….

“your salad is better than movie theater popcorn.”

I almost choked on a piece of arugula.

Ok, I’m done bragging about my salad-making abilities. But, now that you have an idea of how much I love salad. Here’s the problem. I don’t love salad so much in the winter. When it’s cold and dreary outside I’m yearning for something warm and comforting. As much as I love salad, eating it in December feels kind of like getting a hug from Frosty the Snowman. Brrrr….

After enjoying some amazing dishes at Thanksgiving, come Monday my body was aching for something green. I’d had it with meat and gravy. I wanted green, crunchy vegetables NOW! When it came time to make dinner I looked in the fridge and the veggies were lacking a bit. But, in the far reaches there were a few things that I could do something with.

Cabbage, fennel, half a red onion, and parsley. Without too much of a plan I sautéed them together and then added some white beans I had sitting in the fridge. I served my creation alongside some delicious shredded pork shoulder that had been bubbling the oven for a few ours (recipe coming soon!). Mister Wes looked at his plate, looked at me and asked, “what’s this?” pointing at my veggie creation. My reply…

“Hmmmm…..how about a hot salad?” Mister Wes, “whatever it is, it’s good!”

Sure, officially it should probably be called a saute but “hot salad” sounds WAY more interesting. Give it a try and let me know what you think!

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Warm Cabbage and Fennel “Salad”

Ingredients

1/2 tablespoon olive oil, butter or ghee (I used avocado oil which I’ve been experimenting with and really love it!)
1 small or 1/2 medium onion, sliced
1/4 head of cabbage, sliced into thumb thick ribbons
1 medium fennel bulb, sliced into pinky thick ribbons
handful of parsley, roughly chopped
1 can (about 1 cup) white beans
salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. In a large saute pan or wide pot heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion with a pinch of salt and saute, stirring frequently until it starts to soften, about 3-4 minutes.
  2. Add the cabbage and fennel, another pinch of salt and stir until everything is well combine. Cover with a lid, lower heat just a tinge (especially if you have a hot stovetop) and let cook for 3-5 minutes. Check on it, give it a stir and cook another 3-5 minutes. Letting it sit without lots of stirring will let the bits on the bottom brown up a bit which is lovely.
  3. Taste your cabbage and fennel to check for doneness. You want it cooked but still retaining some crunch. Add the beans and cook a few minutes more until they are warmed through. Before serving stir in the parsley and add salt and pepper to taste.

Note: If you do dairy you could add some freshly grated parmesan on top. This dish can be served as a side with dinner or topped with a fried egg for breakfast!

Comments { 2 } · Posted on December 9, 2014 in Healthy Recipes

Five foods that fight the flu

Some estimates state that Americans get a billion colds each year and there are more than 200 viruses that can cause them. Colds can be just the sniffles or morph into pneumonia that results in a visit to the hospital.

Many of us have just accepted that we will get sick at some point during the fall and winter months.

What if this year you didn’t suffer from a stuffy nose, irritating cough or chills?

It is never too early to start building up your immune system so it is primed and ready to attack an oncoming virus. Interestingly, many foods contain the exact nutrients our bodies need to nourish and strengthen our immune system.

Here are my five favorite foods for fighting off colds and flus.

Cabbage

Cabbage is loaded with vitamin C and is the top infection fighter and wound healer. Other sources include broccoli, parsley, kiwi and mango. Keep in mind that this sensitive vitamin is damaged by heat, so it is a good idea to eat most of your cabbage raw or lightly steamed.

How to use it: My favorite way to use cabbage is to shred it for an Asian style slaw or a green salad with apples and toasted nuts. Experiment with different kinds of cabbage like purple and green cabbage, Napa cabbage, Savoy cabbage. And, don’t forget that bok choy and Brussels sprouts also belong to the cabbage family!

Rustic Cabbage Soup from 101Cookbooks

Garlic

Garlic has been used as both food and medicine for thousands of years. Gravediggers in 18th century France drank crushed garlic in wine believing it would protect them from the plague, and during both world wars, soldiers were given garlic to prevent gangrene.

This little stinker is packed with a phytochemical called allicin, an antimicrobial compound. One study showed that people who took a garlic supplement during cold season were less likely to become sick.

How to use it: Chopping or crushing garlic stimulates the enzymatic process that converts the phytonutrient alliin into powerful allicin. When cooking with garlic, be sure to chop it and let it sit for at least five minutes to allow this conversion to take place.

How to roast garlic in the oven from The Kitchn

Lentils

Zinc is critical for the immune system. When a bacteria or virus enters the body, zinc is responsible for rallying the white blood cells to attack the invader. Other good sources of zinc are grass-fed beef and lamb, pumpkin seeds, chickpeas, cashews and quinoa.

How to use it: Brown and green lentils become very soft when cooked and are commonly used for lentil soup. French lentils keep their shape and are perfect for a warm or room temperature lentil salad with vinaigrette dressing.

Hearty Lentil and Quinoa Stew from Herbal Academy of New England

Mushrooms

Mushrooms often get overlooked as a health food, but they contain two big cold and flu fighters.

The first is selenium, which helps white blood cells produce cytokines that are responsible for mopping up sickness. The second is beta glucan, a type of fiber that has antimicrobial properties that activate cells that find and destroy infections.

How to use it: Shiitake are a powerful mushroom that can easily be found at local farmers markets and grocery stores. Sauté them for a savory frittata or with your favorite greens. You can cook them ahead of time and store them for two to three days until you need them. Keep them in a paper bag in the fridge. The bag absorbs the moisture from the mushrooms, keeping them fresh longer.

Asian Style Shiitake Mushrooms and Baby Bok Choy from Tartine and Apron Strings

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a great source of beta-carotene, a powerful antioxidant. It helps improve your body’s defenses by helping in the growth and development of the immune system while also neutralizing harmful toxins. You can get beta-carotene from other orange foods like carrots, squash, pumpkin and egg yolks.

How to prepare: Sweet potatoes (and other winter squash) are perfect for roasting. Simply cut into bite-sized cubes, place on a cookie sheet and drizzle with a bit of olive oil and a pinch of salt and roast for 25 to 30 minutes at 375 degrees. You can eat them as is, mix them with sautéed greens or mash them to use as a filling for a vegetarian burrito.

Roasted Sweet Potato, Kale, Sage and Quinoa Skillet from With Food + Love

This article was originally published in The Sentinel and on Cumberlink.com
Comments { 0 } · Posted on October 26, 2014 in General

Gingered Cabbage and Carrot Slaw

I typically serve a big salad with every dinner. We skip salad plates and usually just eat it right out of a big ceramic salad bowl we received as a wedding gift. It’s become such a habit that I always forget to give dinner guests salad plates and I have to stop myself from diving fork-first into the bowl. You know your friends are considered family when they are invited to eat directly out of your salad bowl.

Yes, we keep it classy on the homestead!

Since delicate greens aren’t quite in season yet I’ve been relying on heartier veggies to create fresh and crunchy salad concoctions. Using things like cabbage, carrots, fennel and Brussels sprouts as bases for salads means salad leftover end up being lunch the next day instead of compost. I made this Gingered Cabbage and Carrot Slaw on a Friday and we ate from it the rest of the weekend! Plus, using your food processor saves a ton of time and your knuckles will be happy that they are not coming into contact with the box grater. THAT is never a good thing!

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Gingered Cabbage and Carrot Slaw

Ingredients

For the salad
handful of parsley
2 medium carrots, peeled
1/4 of a head of green cabbage, cut in half
1/2 an apple, chopped

For the dressing
Juice of 1 lemon (lime juice would work too)
1/2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar (optional, depends on how sour you like it)
1 drop DoTERRA ginger essential oil (you can also finely grate fresh ginger, use about 1/2 tablespoon and add more if needed)
salt and pepper to taste
drizzle of organic extra virgin olive oil (about 2 teaspoons)

Instructions

    1. Add the parsley to the food processor and pulse until roughly chopped. You don’t have to remove the parsley from the food processor. You’re basically going to build your salad in the food processor. Add grating insert and the grate carrots. Then, remove the grating insert and replace with the slicing insert. Slice the cabbage into the carrots and parsley.
    2. Put the prepared vegetables into your serving bowl and add the apples. Toss until well combined and set aside.
    3. In a small bowl mix the lemon juice, apple cider vinegar (if using), ginger and a generous pinch of salt. Whisk until well combined and pour over the slaw. Mix the slaw until well coated. Let sit for at least 10 minutes before serving. The salt and acid will help soften the cabbage a bit and draw out some of the water. Shortly before serving drizzle the olive oil on top and add some freshly grated pepper. Toss and serve. Enjoy!

Are you on Facebook? Then make sure you are a Home Cooked Healing fan! All fans will be entered in the Sassy Saltbox Giveaway. Drawing will take place April, 1 2014!

Comments { 0 } · Posted on March 18, 2014 in General, Healthy Recipes

Kick Out Cancer with Cabbage

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and this weeks fall soup recipe is packed with a food that can help us kick cancer in the kitchen. By cooking and eating whole, unprocessed foods you are taking a huge step towards preventing and recovering from cancer and many other diseases. True health really begins in your kitchen!

The American Cancer Society’s key recommendation to reduce the risk of cancer is to eat cruciferous vegetables on a regular basis. Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage. This group of vegetables contains more phytochemicals (mostly in the form of glucocsinolates) with demonstrable anticancer properties than any other vegetable family. Popular studies have shown that the higher the intake of these vegetables the lower the rates of cancer, particularly colon, prostate, lung and breast cancer.

Cabbage is “king” of the cruciferous vegetable family because of its extra-special health powers. The glucocsinolates in cabbage work primarily by increasing antioxidant mechanisms and improving the body’s ability to detoxify and eliminate harmful chemicals and hormones. That means keeping cancer out and inviting health in!

If that wasn’t enough, cabbage also has more vitamin C than oranges. A weakened immune system doesn’t just open you up for the common cold but also creates a more hospitable environment for cancer.

Fall is a great time to fill up on cabbage and all its amazing nutritional benefits. The market has beautiful tender cabbage that is sweet, crisp and perfect for a warming soup. Stop by the demonstration tent between 3-5 pm this afternoon to see how this delicious soup is made and get the first taste. You’ll never look at cabbage the same way again!

Curried Cabbage and Potato Soup

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

½ head green cabbage (about 16-20 ounces)
1 tablespoon coconut oil or extra virgin olive oil
4-5 medium potatoes, unpeeled, cut into smaller than bite sized cubes
2 tablespoons Thai green curry paste (you can also use Indian powdered curry)
3 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
5 cups of water or vegetable broth
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
sea salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Remove any ragged leaves from the cabbage. Halve the cabbage (so you have two quarters) and remove the core. Slice the cabbage into thin strips about as thick as a pencil. You can do this with a knife or on a mandolin. Cut the long strips in half once.
  2. Warm the coconut oil over medium heat in a large heavy bottomed pot or Dutch oven. Add the potatoes and a pinch of salt. Cook the potatoes, stirring occasionally for about 5-7 minutes until they start to become tender and brown a bit. They may stick a bit but don’t worry. The water will help get those stuck bits off the bottom. Stir in the curry paste (or powder), garlic and onion. Cook for another minute or so.
  3. Add the water and chickpeas. Raise the heat and bring the soup to a simmer. Add the cabbage and cook for another 3-4 minutes until it begins to soften. Don’t worry if it looks like there’s a lot of cabbage. It will collapse quite a bit.
  4. Taste your broth and add salt and pepper as needed. If you want a stronger flavor you can add more curry paste or a few shots of tamari. Enjoy!

Serving Suggestion: This soup is delicious on it’s own but I really love it with a splash of coconut milk which gives it a very distinct Thai flavor. Or, you can add less water and put in a whole can of coconut milk – also delicious! You can also add a cup of cooked brown rice or millet to make it even heartier and filling.

Comments { 0 } · Posted on October 15, 2013 in Healthy Recipes

A Salad Double-Whammy

It’s often assumed that because I work in the food and health field I only order salad when I eat out at a restaurant. Au contraire! This may come as a surprise but I hardly ever order salad at a restaurant. Why? Because most restaurant salads are HUGELY disappointing, tasteless and completely lacking any imagination. Does anyone really enjoy a pile of iceberg lettuce, barely ripe cherry tomatoes and dried up slices of cucumber? It makes sense that you would douse that in calorie-laden ranch dressing! That’s the only thing that can make a salad like that remotely palatable.

Ok, so maybe I’m being really hard on restaurant salad selections. But, please know that salad shouldn’t be an afterthought and it can taste totally incredible, be completely satisfying and…. (drumroll please)……ridiculously easy to make!

I recently made the green salad I’m sharing with you today at the farmers market. One of my cooking class students stopped by to say hello and told me how she had been making some of the recipes (which always makes my heart happy). But then she said,

Tanya, you make salad taste better than movie theater popcorn!

And then, I almost passed out.

It’s certainly a high bar, but I have to agree. With a few pantry staples and some fresh ingredients a salad can be an incredibly satisfying and delicious meal or snack.

Here are my 4 essentials to making a killer, “better-than-movie-theater-popcorn” salad. There is no reason to eat another mediocre salad EVER again!

1) Fresh – It goes without saying that using fresh, seasonal ingredients is essential for a radically amazing salad. In the spring and summer use fresh baby greens. In the fall and winter cabbage and kale make wonderful hearty salads. Adding fresh herbs will also give your salad a little something extra. Visit your local market and farmers to get the best quality produce possible. Or, grow your own! It’s about time to plant kale so you have it in time the fall and herbs are super easy to grow in pots on your windowsill.
2) Sour – As a kid I would drink the salad dressing out of the salad bowl because I loved the sour, vinegar-y taste. Now….I still do that on occasion 🙂 There are so many different types of vinegars to experiment with – from fancy balsamic to simple white vinegar. Lemons and limes are some of my favorite additions as well. You can also add sour taste with different types of mustard. Don’t be afraid to experiment!
3) Sweet – For the longest time I thought that fruit had no place in a green salad. But, I’ve since changed my mind. Adding a some chopped apple or dried cherries adds a wonderful sweet taste to your salad that can be unexpected. Plus, by adding a little sweetness to your meal you’re less likely to crave the sweets after dinner is done.
4) Crunch – Crunch is key for completing your salad. I toast nuts and seeds ahead of time and store them in glass jars. Then, all it takes is a little sprinkle! They are a great alternative to croutons and pack a big nutritional punch. If they are missing from a salad Mr. Wes immediately asks “where are my nuts!” Yes, that one is always good for a laugh.

And now, on to the recipes!

The great thing about salad is that you can totally make it up. These recipes are just guidelines. You can add in any kind of fruit, shredded carrots, different herbs, fruit, nuts, seeds, whatever!

Cabbage and Greens Salad with Tamari Toasted Pumpkin Seeds

Serves 4

Ingredients
½ cup pumpkin seeds
½ tablespoon tamari
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Juice of ½ lemon (about 1 tablespoon)
½ teaspoon maple syrup or honey
1 teaspoon mustard (Dijon or grain mustard work well)
Pinch of salt and pepper to taste
3 handfuls mixed salad greens
¼ medium cabbage, red or green
1 green onion, white and green parts chopped
1 tablespoon chopped herbs of choice (thyme, chives, tarragon all work well)

Instructions

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add pumpkin seeds and toast, stirring or tossing the seeds frequently so they don’t burn. The seeds should begin to puff up and brown slightly. When most of the seeds have started to brown, turn off the heat and add the tamari. (The tamari will make the pan sizzle loudly and steam will rise – don’t be afraid! This is totally normal). Start stirring the seeds immediately with a wooden spoon so they are fully coated in the tamari. Within a minute or two the tamari will have dried up. Put the seeds on a plate or platter in a single layer so they can cool.
  2. In a small bowl whisk together the olive oil, lemon, maple syrup, mustard, salt and pepper.  Taste and adjust flavor as needed. For more depth you can add a splash of balsamic vinegar.
  3. Cut the cabbage in half and then cut one of the halves in half again (so you have two quarters and one half). Finely slice one of the quarters using a mandolin or sharp knife. You can run your knife through the cabbage once or twice after slicing it if the slices seem too long. If you want more cabbage or your cabbage is a bit small slice the other quarter. Reserve the remaining cabbage for another use.
  4. In a large salad bowl combine the mixed greens, cabbage, green onion and herbs. Add half the dressing and toss until well combined. Taste the salad and add more dressing if necessary.
  5. Before serving sprinkle with a handful of the toasted pumpkin seeds. Store remaining seeds in a jar. They will keep for weeks and are a great addition to any salad instead of croutons! Or, as a snack as is.  Enjoy!

 Sesame-Ginger Rice Noodles with Cucumbers and Carrots

 Serves 3-4

Ingredients
8 ounces rice noodles
1 large English cucumber
2 medium carrots
3-4 green onions (scallions), white and green parts chopped
1/3 cup tahini
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
juice from half a lemon (you can skip the rice vinegar and use a whole lemon instead)
1 tablespoon white miso paste
2 teaspoons tamari (San-J brand recommended)
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
pinch of red pepper flakes
1/3 cup water
cilantro or parsley to garnish
salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Bring large pot of water to a boil, add the soba noodles, according to the package directions. You want them to have a bit of a bite. Be careful not to overcook them! Drain and rinse under cold water. Put noodles into a large serving dish or bowl.
  2. Peel the cucumber and then cut in half lengthwise. Scrape out the seeds inside with a spoon. Thinly slice each cucumber half so you end up with “c” shape pieces. Add the cucumber to the noodles.
  3. Peel the carrots, cut in half and thinly slice them similar to the cucumber. Add the carrots to the noodles and cucumbers. Add the green onion as well.
  4. In a food processor or blender add the rice wine vinegar, lemon juice, miso paste, tamari, sesame oil and red pepper flakes. Give it a spin to start combining everything. Add a bit of the water and blend again. You don’t want your dressing to thick or too thin. Continue adding water until you have a nice creamy consistency. Try the dressing and add salt to taste. You can also add more tamari, sesame oil or lemon juice if it needs a little more flavor.
  5. Pour half the dressing over the noodle mixture and toss with tongs. Add more dressing if needed. The noodles and veggies can thin out the flavor a bit so have a taste and add more salt or other dressing ingredients if needed. Enjoy!
Comments { 2 } · Posted on August 5, 2013 in General, Healthy Recipes

Sautéed Bok Choy with Garlic and Ginger

Bok choy has got it all! It has a deliciously sweet and mild taste. Its leaves are tender while its stalks provide a satisfying crunch. Plus, it cooks up quickly! It is most often used in Asian soups and stir-fries but can also be added to salads or served on it’s own as a fantastic side dish. Being part of the cabbage family it is of course also packed with amazing nutrients that are beneficial for your health

Here are 3 reasons to bring this tasty green home today!

Lower Blood Pressure Naturally: Bok choy is packed with potassium and calcium, both of which help to lower blood pressure.
Your Antioxidant Ally: This veggie is loaded in antioxidant vitamins A and C. One cup of cooked bok choy provides more than 100% of the RDA of vitamin A and almost two-thirds the RDA vitamin C.
Dynamic Digestion: Bok choy is a good source of fiber, which is essential for a healthy digestive system. Fiber also helps manage weight, balance blood sugar and helps eliminate toxins.

The farmers market is abundant with bok choy this time of year. Stop by the market this afternoon between 3 and 7 to pick up a few bunches. Then, stop by the demo tent to see me make this recipe so you’ll be ready to hit the kitchen when you get home!

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Sautéed Bok Choy with Garlic and Ginger

Serves 4

Ingredients
½ tablespoon coconut oil
2 bunches bok choy
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 clove garlic
2 teaspoon tamari
drizzle of toasted sesame oil
salt to taste
pinch of crushed red pepper (optional)

Instructions

  1. Prepare the bok choy by cutting the stalk parts from the leaves. Slice the stalks at an angle into 1-inch pieces. Layer the leaves on top of each other, roll up tightly and slice into 1-inch strips. Place stalks and leaves in separate bowls.
  2. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Sauté the stalks with a pinch of salt about 3-4 minutes, until they start to become translucent and tender. Add garlic and ginger and give a good stir to combine.
  3. Add the leaves to the pan and toss well so everything is combined. Sauté the leaves about 1 minute until they begin to wilt lightly. Add tamari and toasted sesame oil. Heat through about 1 more minute. Taste and add more tamari, sesame oil or salt as necessary. Enjoy!

Serving suggestions: You can serve this as a side dish alongside chicken or fish. It’s also delicious mixed with brown rice and topped with a fried egg for a quick and simple dinner.

Comments { 0 } · Posted on May 22, 2013 in Healthy Recipes