Sea Salt Popcorn with Kale Crumbles

Kale Popcorn Recipe Meme

I’ll be the first to admit it….there is SOMETHING about movie theater popcorn that is utterly delicious. And, no visit to the movie theater feels complete without it.

I also know that just two or three handfuls isn’t enough of this addicting, salty, crunchy snack. Before you know it your down to the crumbs….and those can’t be left behind either! I hope I’m not alone with this…

Unfortunately, the traditional movie theater popcorn doesn’t do much for our health. According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest a medium popcorn and soda combo at a Regal movie theater is calorically comparable to three McDonalds Quarter Pounders with 12 extra pats of butter!!!! 

Give me a minute while I pick my jaw up off the ground…..

If you have worked with me, heard me speak or attended one of my workshops you know that I’m not one to dwell on calories. Using calories is a misguided way of choosing healthy foods, in my opinion. To put is simply – 300 calories of broccoli and 300 calories of jelly beans just are not the same nutritionally speaking.

However, the comparison of popcorn to fast food and a load of butter take it to a whole new level. This is NOT ok – especially since sitting and watching a two-house movie isn’t exactly a super energy burning activity.

Aside from the ridiculous number of calories in that box of popcorn we should also talk about the QUALITY of the ingredients. Popcorn ingredients and process varies from theater to theater. But, suffice to say that cheap, low quality ingredients are the norm everywhere. They want to make max profit on that $8 box they’re selling!

Corn is one of the main GM (genetically modified) foods in the US, so you can be sure that this is the kind movie theaters are popping up into those white clouds of crunchy goodness. GM foods have become a concern for many in regards to our health and environmental impacts.

But the yumminess of our popcorn doesn’t stop there. The oil and salt is what makes eating it so satisfying! Many years ago movie theaters used coconut oil to make their popcorn but it has since been demonized as being an unhealthy saturated fat (in case you haven’t heard, coconut oil is NOT bad for you!). In response theaters started popping corn using low quality, canola oil – a VERY unhealthy trans fat. The salt is your traditional, iodized salt which has been depleted of critical minerals. Adding that buttery topping? You’re squirting artificial flavorings, colors and who knows what other weird stuff on there.

I’m not here to ruin your next movie theater experience. I want to give you an amazing alternative that will satisfy the biggest salt craving and add some wonderful nutrients to this normally guilt inducing snack.

Bring your big purse and sneak a few bags into your next movie date…..not that I’m speaking from experience here….

I do recommend getting a air popcorn popper. They usually run no more than $20 and will provide you will endless bowls of delicious, fresh, chemical free snacking. And, a cheap movie snack!

Kale Popcorn Recipe Meme

Sea Salt Popcorn with Kale Crumbles
Serves 3-4

Ingredients

For the kale crumbles
1 large bunch of kale (you can also use bagged kale if you prefer)
1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted
sea salt

For the popcorn
1/4 cup organic popping corn (the organic label ensures that you are also buying a non-GMO product).
6 tablespoons extra virgin coconut oil, melted
2 teaspoons sea salt
Nutritional yeast, to take (optional)

Instructions – kale crumbles

1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees.

2. Remove ribs from kale and cut into large pieces (1 1/2 to 2 inches). Place kale pieces on a baking sheet and drizzle with the melt coconut oil. Toss until well coated. You want the kale to be slightly coated with oil, not dripping. Sprinkle with a few pinches of sea salt.

3. Place baking sheet in oven and bake for about 20 minutes, turning the leaves halfway through. Keep an eye on them as they can burn quickly. Remove from oven when most of the kale is crisped – often not all will crisp up in the oven, but will finish while the kale cools on the pan. Place the pan on a heat safe surface until the kale cools completely.

4. Once the kale is cool, crumble it in your hands into a small bowl. Set aside.

Instructions – popcorn

1. While the kale is in the oven you can make your popcorn using an air popper.

2. If you don’t have an air popper you can do it on the stovetop. Using the biggest pot you have heat about 1 tablespoon of coconut oil over medium heat. When hot add your corn, cover with a lid and reduce heat to medium-low (the temperature may vary depending on your stove). Shake the pot every 30-45 second to keep the kernels moving around so they don’t burn. Covering the pot lid with a dishtowel can help keep the heat from your hands. Keep shaking until you hear popping, turn off the heat and let the pot sit on the stove until the popping stops. You might want to give it a shake or two while the corn pops to keep the kernels moving.

3. Once your popcorn is done, pour it into a bowl, drizzle with the melted coconut oil and sprinkle with salt, nutritional yeast (if using) and kale crumbles. Don’t go too crazy with the salt! Don’t forget the kale has some salt on it and the nutritional yeast also has a salty flavor. Taste and add more salt if needed.

Comments { 1 } · Posted on April 13, 2016 in Healthy Recipes

Six Ways to Spice Up Your Health

I don’t know about you, but November totally snuck up on me!

It seems like Mister Wes and I were JUST getting started grilling and having dinners on the deck. 

But, I’m not really that upset about it. There is something refreshing and comforting about bundling up in sweaters and scarves, inhaling the cool air and sipping on warming soups.

(I know, I know….I might feel differently about it when we’re knee-high in snow drifts! For now, just let me remain positive.)

Fall is the perfect time to bring out warming spices for cool weather drinks and dishes. From homemade hot chocolate to pumpkin spice muffins, there are certain spices that pair perfectly with the crisp leaves and shorter days of autumn.

Is there anything better than oatmeal with cinnamon or a little cayenne in your hot cocoa?

However, spices can do so much more than just enhance the flavor of your food – they can also enhance your health. Head on over to the blog to check out my six favorite fall spices to enjoy amazing flavors and incredible health benefits!

CINNAMON is a powerful antioxidant that can improve insulin response and help keep blood sugar under control. Research shows that eating half a teaspoon of cinnamon daily reduces risk factors for diabetes and heart disease within six weeks.

How to use it: Cinnamon is commonly used in oatmeal and other breakfast foods. But, it pairs well with savory dishes as well like fall squashes, lamb and chicken. Search for Moroccan recipes, which frequently use cinnamon.
———-
NUTMEG contains antibacterial compounds that can help fight germs in your mouth. The primary substance is macelignan, which reduces plaque formation by 50 percent and eradicates cavity-producing microbes, according to Italian researchers.

How to use it: Nutmeg pairs well with winter squashes, leafy greens as well as yogurt. Try it in coffee or homemade hot chocolate.
———-
GINGER is known for it’s ability to calm upset stomach and relieve nausea, but it has also been shown to help decrease pain. Gingerol, a chemical in ginger, is thought to reduce inflammation and block nerve pathways that process pain.

How to use it: Ginger is a great addition to stir-fries, cabbage slaws and in pureed pumpkin soup.
———-
TURMERIC, also found in curry powders, is given its bright yellow color by curcumin. This powerful substance is getting a lot of attention in the scientific community for it’s potential anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties.

How to use it: Curry and turmeric are essential for Indian curry dishes. You can also add turmeric to sautéed leafy greens, or blend it with honey and add it to hot water for a refreshing hot drink.
———-
CAYENNE helps crank up your body’s thermostat by giving your metabolism a nice boost, thanks to the substance capsaicin. On a side note, use a sprinkle of cayenne on a cut to staunch bleeding. Surprisingly, this does not sting as you might expect!

How to use it: A small amount of cayenne doesn’t add spice as much as it adds just a touch of heat to dishes. If you are a fast eater, adding just a small pinch of cayenne can help slow you down. Cayenne is perfect for chili or on roasted winter squash.
———-
CUMIN can provide up to 22 percent of your daily iron intake in just one tablespoon. Preliminary research has also shown that this spice can boost your brainpower: in an animal study, consuming cumin extract was shown to improve performance on memory tests.

How to use it: Cumin is used in Indian, Mexican and Spanish dishes. You can use it already ground, or toast the seeds for a stronger flavor. From black beans and rice to Indian curry, cumin is an all around spice that can be used in a variety of ways.

Comments { 2 } · Posted on November 10, 2015 in General

Gluten Free Banana Oat Pancakes

I’m an egg girl when it comes to breakfast. But every so often, on a lazy Sunday morning, pancakes start calling my name.

I’m also a pretty lazy cook. Which means that even the thought of pulling out oodles of ingredients from the pantry and making a mess that takes longer to clean up than the time I will have to enjoy the pancakes, leads me right back to my trusty, low mess, scrambled eggs. (No Bisquick mix in this house!)

But, all that changed when I came up with this recipe. Pancakes are back on the menu!

Not only does everything just go right into one bowl, these are ingredients that are always hanging out in my pantry. Plus, they are gluten free, have a good dose of healthy fats and some heart healthy fiber.

Need a quick breakfast or late morning snack? I like to pop two or three leftover pancakes in a toaster oven, slather with peanut butter and honey. Oh. So. Good!

As you can see from the peaches (did you notice?), I’ve been holding on to this recipe for quite a while. Now, with the days getting cooler and shorter it’s the perfect time for pancakes. We’ll just have to wait a few months for those peaches to be back!

Ok, now that you’re drooling onto your keyboard and you can’t wait for the weekend to start so you can whip up your very own batch, here is the recipe….

Banana Oatmeal Pancakes

Gluten Free Banana Oat Pancakes
Makes 10-12 pancakes

Ingredients

2 bananas (soft, almost brown)
2 large eggs
1/4 cup coconut milk (you could also use regular milk or other dairy alternative)
1 cup applesauce (the individual cups are perfect!)
1 tablespoon coconut palm sugar
2 cups gluten free old fashioned oats (Bob’s Red Mill is a good brand)
1 tablespoon baking powder
pinch of salt
coconut oil

Instructions

  1. In a medium mixing bowl mash the bananas with a fork
  2. Add the eggs, milk, applesauce, and sugar. Mix with a whisk or hand mixer until well combined.
  3. Now, add the oats, baking powder and pinch of salt. Mix again until everything is just combined. Don’t overmix!
  4. Melt a small scoop of coconut oil in pan. Once hot, add scoops of your pancake mix. The pan should be hot enough to make the batter sizzle a bit. When the pancakes start to bubble, flip them over. You want them to me golden brown on each side. Keep them warm in a preheated oven.
  5. Serve with real maple syrup, nuts, hemp seeds, or fresh fruit. Enjoy!

 

Comments { 2 } · Posted on November 4, 2015 in Healthy Recipes

Six Superfoods for Women

Nature demands a lot of women. Fluctuating hormones, growing babies, demanding work schedules, managing households, and shuttling children to endless activities requires nearly superhuman powers. However, with the right nutrients on your side you can get through it all with less struggle and greater joy.

Here are six great-tasting superfoods to help you get through is all, while keeping your health intact. For the greatest benefits, include two to three servings of each these foods every week.

1. Leafy greens: Kale, Swiss chard, collards greens, spinach, and their cousins provide bone building calcium. They are also high in folate, the natural form of folic acid, which is important for pregnant women and may also prevent cervical cancer. Leafy greens that are part of the crucifer family (including kale, collards, mustard greens, and turnips) contain a compound that helps the body metabolize estrogen into a safer, more usable form to boost protection against breast and other hormone-related cancers.
How to use: Virtually all leafy greens are a great addition to soups and stews. When sautéed with onions and garlic they make a simple and delicious side dish. Adding lemon to greens helps cut their bitterness and makes their iron content more easily absorbed in the body.

2. Fatty Fish: Wild salmon and sardines provide high-quality protein as well as a healthy dose of omega 3 fatty acids. Omega 3’s may help prevent menopause-related depression and mood changes. This healthy fat also reduces LDL (lousy/bad) cholesterol, lowers blood pressure and protects the brain against Alzheimer’s disease.
How to use: If you don’t have time to cook fresh fish, don’t fret. Canned salmon and sardines are an excellent alternative, while still providing the same health benefits. Serve them alongside a salad, on a sandwich or make fish patties. Up to 6 ounces per serving, twice a week is also safe for expecting moms.

3. Berries: Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and others, are some of the healthiest, and most beautiful, foods available to us. Berries are an important source of an anthrocyanidins, a chemical that not only gives berries their vibrant colors, but provides us with powerful antioxidant effects that strengthen our blood vessels, helping to protect our hearts, prevent varicose veins (which includes hemorrhoids), improve our eyesight, reduce inflammation, and prevent cancer.
How to use: When berries are not available fresh, frozen organic berries are a great substitute. Use them on yogurt or cottage cheese, in smoothies or salads.

4. Avocados: Avocados are lean green nutrient machines! Avocados contain healthy monounsaturated fats. Avocados are loaded in nutrients, such as potassium, magnesium, folate and B6. They help keep you satisfied and prevent cravings while also nourishing skin, hair and nails.
How to use: Try having half an avocado alongside your breakfast eggs in the morning, or add it to your lunchtime salad. Avocados also make smoothies nice and creamy.

5. Flaxseeds: Flaxseeds are rich in lignans, compounds that naturally modulate estrogen levels. This can increase protection against breast cancer and promote regular ovulation. They contain omega 3’s for heart health and protein for sustained energy. Plus, flaxseeds high fiber content prevents constipation and improves colon health.
How to use: Buy whole flaxseeds and grind them fresh before using to gain maximum benefits. You can add them to yogurt, smoothies, sprinkle them on salads or use them in baked goods.

6. Dark chocolate: That’s right! Even dark chocolate has superfood health benefits for women, especially for your heart. Heart diseaseßs is the leading cause of death for women in the United State. Cocoa contains flavonoids, which have antioxidant properties and can suppress oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol), which can cause cardiovascular disease.
How to use: Choose at least 70% dark chocolate and enjoy one piece per day. They key with chocolate is to take your time and savor it, instead of eating it for emotional reasons. You can also try adding raw cacao to a smoothie for a “healthy-fied” milkshake.

What superfoods do you use to supercharge your health?

Comments { 0 } · Posted on October 20, 2015 in General

What can kale do for you?

Wednesday is National Kale Day. And, with cooler weather approaching, this nutritional powerhouse will be popping up at our local farmers markets.

Kale has been cultivated for more than 2,000 years. It was popular in Europe during the Roman times and the Middle Ages, it arrived in North America in the 17th century. America plants more acres in Kale than Brussels sprouts. There are over 50 varieties of kale, and there happens to be 50 Shades of Kale as well.

This leafy green vegetable is incredibly nutrient-dense and should be part of your weekly meal rotation.

Just one cup of raw kale…

  • contains just 33 calories
  • provides 134% of your daily vitamin C needs
  • provides 684% of your daily vitamin K needs
  • provides 204% of vitamin A
  • is an excellent source of calcium and iron

Clearly, a little goes a long way!

Click here for my favorite kale recipe – even my husband dives right in!

Kale and cancer

Apart from its impressive vitamin and mineral content, kale also contains over 45 different flavonoids – healing compounds that are found in the pigments and the cell structures of the leaves. These compounds could potentially prevent cancer. According to nutritionist George Mateljan, kale has been associated with lowering the risks of at least five different types of cancer. These include cancer of the bladder, breast, colon, ovary, and prostate.

Kale and diabetes

Kale can also be helpful for those diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Eating kale and other leafy greens provides a healthy amount of fiber that can play an important role in balancing blood sugar. It also contains some protein, which can help with sustained energy and keep blood sugar stable. 1 cup of raw kale contains 1 gram of fiber and 3 grams of protein.

Kale and liver health

Kale, and other similar bitter greens like collards, Swiss chard and dandelion greens are incredibly cleansing for the liver due to their high sulfur content. Your liver is your body’s detox organ and keeping it functioning properly will ensure toxins are able to be properly processed.

According to the Environmental Working Group’s Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen list, kale should be organic, when possible. Since kale is a hardy vegetable, inexpensive and easy to grow, it is generally close in price to conventionally grown kale.

Kale can be eaten raw or cooked. Cooking does not damage the nutrients as long it is brief – 10-15 minutes at high heat, or 35 minutes at lower heat or when baking. Kale can be added to soups, stews, salads, and smoothies.

For some, kale can have too bitter of a taste. Simply adding lemon juice to your kale salad or sauté can help cut the bitterness and add a refreshing taste. After a frost, kale becomes sweeter. So, perhaps basing your purchase on the weather will make kale even more appealing for you!

Comments { 0 } · Posted on October 6, 2015 in General, Healthy Recipes

Awesome Autumn Breakfast Bowl

 

Autumn Breakfast Bowl

How is it almost October already???!!!

This summer just flew by and I completely neglected my newsletter and blog. I had to take a break and give space for some new inspiration to come in. I am incredibly impatient so stepping back, making space and waiting is NOT my strong suit.

However, it was worth the wait and I have some exciting classes, programs and projects on the horizon for 2016. Now you just have to be patient until I can tell you about them 🙂

In the meantime, I’m back in action with a stockpile of rad recipes and helpful articles to get you back in the kitchen and treating your body well with real, whole foods.

I just got back from a fantastic long weekend retreat with two dear girlfriends and fellow owners. We spent four days in a lovely cabin settled in the woods. We planned this trip back in May with the intention of getting away and focusing on projects for the coming year. And boy, were we productive!

We brainstormed a new program during morning walks, clarified what direction we want our businesses to go in 2016, wrote articles, ebooks and handbooks. Despite all the work we of course also had loads of fun, laughed a ton, went on walks, did yoga, Tarot card readings, watched deer from the deck and most importantly, ate some really incredible food.

We didn’t plan a menu or really have any idea what were going to eat while on our little work retreat. Instead, we grabbed what we had from our refrigerators, pantries and CSA boxes, and let the food dictate our meals. It worked beautifully!

12006348_965241973515265_1324019902528696558_n

I want to tell you about the porridge that I made during our retreat that turned out so beautifully, we all snapped pictures before digging in. It was literally, autumn in a bowl and I think I might eat this again and again until spring rounds the corner in several months.

I used leftover rice from our dinner the night before, warmed with coconut milk, cinnamon and maple syrup. In order to cook the butternut squash quickly, I sliced it about the thickness of a pencil and roasted it together with sliced apple at a high heat. Toasted almond slivers is something I have on hand all the time – they are the perfect addition to salads, puddings and porridge dishes. They are easy to make in a dry pan and store well in jars.

While I eat eggs for breakfast nearly every morning, I was surprised that this porridge filled me up and kept me satisfied for several hours. Plus, it was a great way to get some veggies in for breakfast!

Enjoy a little morning retreat with this special Awesome Autumn Breakfast Bowl. What other things would you top this dish off with?

Awesome Autumn Breakfast Bowl

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

half a small-medium butternut squash
half of an apple
coconut oil
2 1/2 cups cooked rice (brown or white, quinoa or millet would work as well)
1/2-3/4 coconut milk, canned, full fat
generous pinch of cinnamon
1-2 tablespoons maple syrup
toasted almond slivers, chia and hemp seeds
1 tablespoon peanut butter (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Peel butternut squash and cut into bite-sized pieces. Remove core from apple and cut into bite sized pieces as well. Toss butternut squash and apple and place on baking sheet with a few small scoops of coconut oil. Place pan in oven and set timer for 5 minutes.
  3. After 5 minutes, remove the pan, toss the squash and apple with the melted oil. Place back in oven for another 8-10 minutes, or until squash begins to soften. Once soft, turn on broiler and brown the squash and apple mixture for 2-3 minutes. Remove from oven and set aside
  4. While the squash and apple are in the oven, warm the rice in a pot with the coconut milk. Once warm add cinnamon and maple syrup. Set stovetop temperature to low to keep rice warm until squash and apple are done.
  5. To serve, fill bowls with rice and top with squash and apple. Garnish with toasted almond slivers, hemp and chia seeds. For added sweetness drizzle with a touch of maple syrup. You can also add a dollop of peanut butter for extra protein. Enjoy the abundant bowl of autumn goodness!
Comments { 2 } · Posted on September 29, 2015 in Healthy Recipes

[Video] How to open a can of coconut milk

Coconut Milk Image

“What is that thick stuff at the top of the can???”

I get this question all the time from clients and students when they open their first can of coconut milk.

My response, “that’s the good stuff!”

Coconut milk is essential when stocking a whole foods pantry.

Coconuts are rich in fiber, vitamin C, E and most of your B vitamins as well as minerals such as iron, selenium and magnesium.

In certain parts of India, especially coastal areas, the coconut tree is referred to as kalpavrisksha which is Sanskrit for, “tree which gives all that is necessary for living” because all parts can be used – the water, milk, sugar and oil.

Check out the video to find out how I open and store my coconut milk.

I recommend buying full fat canned coconut milk rather than the kind found in the refrigerated section of the grocery store.

The canned version has very few ingredients – coconut, milk and guar gum (a safe stabilizer) whereas the refrigerated version has a laundry list of ingredients, additives and sugar. Ick!

Coconut milk is a great substitute if you’re dairy free or are wanting to experiment going without dairy for a while.

I use coconut milk in curries, veggies soups, smoothies, chia pudding, chocolate milk, and as a substitute in baking recipes.

Recently, I learned you can make whipping cream with it.

I see a fruit crumble in my future…..

Do you have a delicious coconut milk recipe? Tell me about it in the comments below!

Comments { 2 } · Posted on May 18, 2015 in General

Love Your Liver Spring Smoothie

Liver Spring Smoothie

I put weeds in my smoothie this morning.

Around 8 am I went for a quick stroll around the yard and picked a few dandelions to put into my breakfast smoothie.

According to Rebecca Wood, the author of The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia dandelion root and leaves are a remarkable  bitter tonic for the spleen, stomach, kidneys and liver.

Furthermore, it stimulates liver function, reduces swelling, inflammation and improves digestion.

Last, but not least, dandelion is a super nutrient-dense food! A cup of dandelion can provide you with almost all the vitamin A you need for the day, plus a third of your vitamin C requirement. It also contains twice as much iron and calcium as broccoli!

Now that is some great motivation to start weeding!

Spring is the perfect time to help clear our livers of stagnation and toxins that have built up over a long winter.

Is it a coincidence that dandelions are in full bloom this time of year? I think not!

Nature knows best.

You can eat wild dandelions – the greens, flower and roots. Just be sure you are gathering them from a clean location that has not been sprayed or fertilized with chemicals.

Dandelion can be used in smoothies as well as in salads, sautes and stir fries.

No only do the dandelions in this recipe have liver health benefits!

Apples, lemon, turmeric and coconut oil also help cleanse the liver and support its overall health.

Ready to put some weeds in your smoothie and give your liver some love?

Liver Spring Smoothie

Love Your Liver Spring Smoothie

Ingredients and Instructions

1 handful of ice
1-2 cups of coconut water or regular filtered water
1 handful of spinach (or other green of choice like kale or Swiss chard)
small handful of gluten free, old fashion oats
1/4 apple, cubed
1 small banana
1 sliver of lemon, peel removed
1 tablespoon each of chia and hemp seeds (or use 2 tablespoons of one kind)
1 tablespoon coconut oil
dash of turmeric
3-4 dandelion leaves and flowers (no stems)
pinch of salt (this helps bring out the sweetness in the fruit)

Blend all the ingredients in your blender and enjoy!

Feel free to adjust the ingredients based on what you have on hand and your personal taste.

Comments { 0 } · Posted on May 12, 2015 in Healthy Recipes

[Video] Should you go gluten free?

Gluten Free Video Pic

Gluten has made a big splash in the food and nutrition world.

Since being linked to a host of health conditions including:

  • chronic fatigue
  • anxiety and depression
  • digestive issues such as IBS/IBD, Crohn’s and Colitis
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • MS
  • and a whole host of other autoimmune conditions such as lupus and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

Now, you can find gluten free everything on supermarket shelves.

So, the question remains….

Should you go gluten free?

And, what the heck is gluten anyway?

And, another question. What foods is it in?

You might also be wondering….

Isn’t going gluten free a total pain where the only food you can eat tastes like cardboard?

Take 5 minutes and watch my latest video where I explain gluten and answer the big question…

Should you go gluten free?

If you want to try going gluten free join me for my 14-Day Whole Foods Cleanse!

You’ll get all the information and support you need to successfully try going gluten free for 14 days. And, it will be easy peasy. I promise!

In your cleanse handbook you’ll get a detailed gluten free guide so you will know exactly how to identify gluten, what foods it’s in, gluten free alternatives and more.

Plus, over 60 delicious gluten free recipes (that taste NOTHING like cardboard!).

Ready to give it a try?

Our first class will take place on Friday, May 8th!

CLICK HERE to learn more and reserve your spot today.

Comments { 0 } · Posted on April 23, 2015 in General

[Recipe] Oven stir fry

Guess what?

Sometimes, the last thing I want to do is cook dinner.

The reasons are varied….

There are days I’m just too damn tired to even THINK about what to cook.

Other times I’m not prepared. Or, what I do have prepped just doesn’t excite me.

Often, I just don’t want to deal with a pile of dishes at the end.

The cooking part can be fun. The cleaning up part can totally suck the fun right out of you.

Can you relate, *|FNAME|*?

I love to cook. Don’t get me wrong.

But, in the hectic of day to day work, house chores, yard maintenance, chicken care, errands and everything else I’m ok with being a lazy cook and making it as easy as possible on myself.

I recently discovered Oven Stir Fry which totally rocked my world and spoke immediately to my lazy cooking ways.

The only dishes are:
1 cutting board
1 knife
1 pan
1 wooden spoon
1 small bowl
Rice cooker
2 bowls and 2 forks (If Mister Wes and I don’t eat directly out of the pan. It’s happened.)Plus, aside from cutting veggies and mixing some sauce it’s pretty much hands off. Throw all the goods in to a deep pan, stir, bake, eat.Oh, and there’s leftovers.Winner, winner, stir fry dinner!

 

Oven Stir Fry
(Recipe note: The beauty of stir fries (and similar dishes) is that you can use a recipe as a guide but then tweak and adjust the ingredients based on your taste and what you have lingering in the fridge. This recipe is very approximate as I literally threw in what I had, mixed a sauce and shoved it in the oven. Trust you instincts and have fun with it! Just make sure all your ingredients fit into your pan.)

Ingredients (This is what I had on hand. Adjust as needed)

2 chicken breasts, cut into smaller than bit sized pieces (I do this to stretch what may not seem like much meat for my meat-loving husband. Sneaky, huh?)
1 medium red onion, sliced
2-3 medium carrots, sliced into bite sized pieces
1-2 crowns broccoli, cut into florets
big handful of green beans, cut in half

 

For the sauce
1/4 cup tamari
drizzle of toasted sesame oil
splash of hot sauce
a few shakes of turmeric
pinch of salt and some fresh pepper
1-2 tablespoons arrowroot powders (this is an excellent alternative to corn starch for thickening sauces and gravies)
water as needed

 

Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Throw all your ingredients into a deep sided pan. I use a lasagna pan.
  3. Make your sauce in a small bowl by whisking together all the ingredients. Give it a taste and adjust as needed. If it’s too salty add some water. But, remember you want it to be pretty strong. Once it gets mixed throughout your veggies and meat the taste will become less strong.
  4. Toss your veggies and meat with the sauce. Cover your pan with foil or a lid and put into the oven.
  5. Bake for about 30 minutes and then check to see if your meat is done. I would suggest giving it all a toss about halfway through. If the meat is not done through, put it back in the oven for another 10-15 minutes. If you want to brown the tops of the veggies a bit you can remove the foil or lid for the final 5 minutes of cooking.
  6. Top with toasted almonds and serve over rice, noodles or my favorite…..boiled cabbage for a grain free options. Seriously, it’s delicious!

Recipe adapted from The Yummy Life

Cleanse-Banner-for-Facebook with Start Date

This recipe is a perfect example of the kinds of recipes in the 14-Day Whole Foods Cleanse. Real food, simple recipes. Ready to EAT your way to great health? Join me today!

Comments { 2 } · Posted on April 21, 2015 in Healthy Recipes